GREEK SLAVE AUTHOR: SCIPIONE TADOLINI (1822-1892, ITALIAN) SPECIAL FEATURES: SIGNED AND DATED “EQ SCIPIONE TADOLINI ROMA 1869”

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Essay
Scipione Tadolini was a skilled sculptor whose broad talent covered the neoclassic to the romantic movements. His ancestors from a dynasty of Roman sculptors exerted a profound and lasting influence on the artistic production of the Eternal City. The Greek Slave fully demonstrates his masterly talent and serves as a reminder of antique models and the orientalist influences characterising the second half of the 19th century.
Scipione Tadolini graduated from the Roman Academy and worked with his father on a series of celebrated portraits and ecclesiastical sculptures for Roman churches including a bust of Cardinal Giuseppe Alberghini for the Gesù (1847) and portraits of various members of the Cini family for the Church of Sant’Andrea della Valle (1844, 1846). Tadolini is also known as the author of a number of large-scale monuments for patrons around the world including an equestrian group of Simon Bolivar for the city of Lima, Peru. One of his best known sculptures is The Greek Slave which appears in his work from the late 1850s forward.
The Greek Slave was created in several sizes in two variations: with the figure’s hand either raised to her chest or to her chin. The small number of versions all indicate the sculptor’s careful attention to the human form and passion with exoticism, which can be noticed through the tumbling folds of the present figure's headdress and the finely articulated jewellery wrapped around her arms. This vision explains its enduring and international popularity. A slightly larger version of the present work sold Sotheby’s, New York, 23 October 2008, lot 97 ($302,500). Another version is in a private collection in Turin.

Dimensions: The figure: 43 ¾ in. (111 cm.) high The marble pedestal: 32 ¾ in. (83 cm.) high